Health of the Podengo

Podengon’s health

Podengon is generally a healthy breed that often lives for a long time. These are robust and well-built dogs, bred to be able to walk in rough terrain for an entire day. However, there are cases of patella (knee joint), leg perth (hip deformity), CECS (a type of seizure) and PRA (retinal disease). With the help of breeders with good knowledge, and facts from the Swedish Kennel Club, we have put together a brief information on each disease below.

Patellar luxation

Patellar luxation means that the kneecap can slip out of its position. There are two forms, the most common being that the kneecap falls on the inside of the knee joint (medially). In the second form, the kneecap ends on the outside of the knee joint (laterally). In cases where the luxation is permanent, the kneecap has slipped out and locked in its position.

Patellar luxation is detected through a special examination (palpation) and is graded between 0-3 where 0 means free / normal and thereafter that the dog has patellar luxation to an increased extent up to 3 which means permanent luxation.

Patellar luxation is hereditary and SKK, the Swedish Kennel Club’s, general recommendation is that only dogs with normal knee joints should breed, and that a dog with clinical symptoms of patellar luxation is never suitable in breeding regardless of examination. SKK also says that breed-specific considerations must always be made regarding hereditary diseases and these are reported by the respective breed club in the breed-specific breeding strategies (RAS). In the Swedish Podengo Portuguese Club’s breeding strategy can be read the following:

All breeding animals of the small variant should be officially examined for patella status after 12 months of age and have the result registered in SKK Dog Data. Breeding animals with patella grade 1 should always be mated with a dog with patella grade 0. Dogs with patella grade 2 and 3 should not be used in breeding.

On SKK Dog data under the veterinarian tab there is a registration if the dog has been examined and what degree it has received.

www.skk.se/hunddata

Legg Perthes

A few cases of Legg Perthes have been discovered on the small variant of podengon. Legg Perthes means that the blood supply to the ball part of the hip joint is temporarily interrupted and the bone begins to die. The disease debuts before the age of 1 and the symptoms are that the dog is limping on one or both hind legs. The dog gets pain but the final diagnosis can only be made after an x-ray of the hips. In the breeding club’s breeding strategy you can read the following:

Aim: To map the presence of Legg Perthes in the small variant and to limit breeding for dogs that have a predisposition for Legg Perthes, to avoid spreading it in the breed. Strategies: Invite owners and breeders to affected dogs to report to the breeding council in the breed club which dog is affected. Affected dogs should not breed. Parents of affected dogs should not breed.

CECS

The disease CECS “Canine Epileptoid Cramping Syndrome”, is also called Spike’s disease after a affected dog ​​in the Netherlands. At CECS, the dog gets a kind of seizure that can last from a few minutes to a quarter or so. The seizures should not be mixed with epilepsy, at CECS the dog is conscious all the time.

Despite many ideas and studies, there is still no established cause of the seizures, nor is there a generally recognized lab diagnosis, so there is no special test one can take to see if the dog is sick. CECS seems to be diet-related with gastrointestinal problems, it is believed to be a form of gluten intolerance, and can therefore alleviate or even cure the symptoms through a modified diet that excludes cereals and gluten.

Note that it is important not to exclude grain and gluten in the diet of the males and bitches who are supposed to breed, you can then completely miss to discover the disease which is hereditary. When it comes to breeding, Åsa Sandberg, vice president of the Border Terrier Society where the disease has been known for a long time, says: “Not to breed a dog that can have the disease, because it is hereditary, both the Border Terrier Clubs and SKK’s veterinary medical advisors agree on. ”

Podengo Friends Magazine no 2 and no 3, 2019 contains a very good article with a detailed description of CECS, written by breeder Åke Esperi. There are also stories from some owners with affected dogs.

www.podengofriends.com/magazine


PRA – eye disease

PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) – is the collective name for a number of diseases affecting the retina of the dog. For podengo, two variants have been found, through DNA testers, prcdPRA and Cord 1-Pra / CRD 4 PRA.

prcdPRA often develops at the age of 5-6 and often leads to total blindness.

Cord 1-Pra / CRD 4 PRA, which is the more unusual variant of the breed, does not automatically lead to blindness.

The disease PRA has simple recessive inheritance which means that the dogs have to get one offspring from the mother and one from the father to develop the disease. prcdPRA will eventually almost always lead to total blindness, where the disease course often starts with dogs becoming night-blind, that they hardly can not see in the evening when it is dark.
Since you can now do DNA testing for both variants, you can prevent the development so that no podengopuppies is born with the disease. It is therefore important to DNA test the males and bitches that you intend to use in breeding, at least one of the parents, if it gets the result Normal / Free. Alternative to use breeding animals whose both parents are DNA-tested free. Dogs that have got the result Carrier on the DNA test is a healthy dog ​​that gives healthy puppies if they are mated with a free tested dog, it is important to remember.

Further information about PRA is available via the link here